Entries marked "Floods"

Tags: , , , , , , , , , ,

UNICEF Goodwill Ambassador David Beckham meets young survivors of Typhoon Haiyan in visit to Philippines

By Thomas Nybo

TACLOBAN, Philippines, 18 February 2014 – UNICEF Goodwill Ambassador David Beckham spent his Valentine’s Day visiting young survivors of Typhoon Haiyan.

For two days, Mr. Beckham toured Tacloban and the surrounding areas, which were among the hardest hit when the powerful storm ripped through the central Philippines 98 days ago.

Read More

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Transitional learning spaces provide safe, resilient learning environments for children living in emergencies

By Carlos Vasquez
Architect, Child Friendly School Designer, UNICEF

NEW YORK, USA, 7 February 2014 – As we publish the 2013 edition of the Compendium of Transitional Learning Spaces (TLS), over 2 million people have fled Syria since the beginning of the conflict in 2011, making this one of the largest refugee exoduses in recent history, with no foreseeable end. The refugee population in the region could reach over 4 million by the end of 2014. Children must endure far-reaching hardships and danger to escape and seek refuge across neighboring countries. This disrupts their schooling and moreover, the most vulnerable children are often disproportionally affected.

© UNICEF/NYHQ2013-1330/Noorani
Eager to respond to their teacher, children raise their hands during an Arabic lesson at a UNICEF-supported kindergarten in Homs in the Syrian Arab Republic.

Similar conflicts and natural disasters are affecting local communities and marginalized children in many parts of the world today: escalating violence in the Central African Republic is posing a threat to children, where thousands are being recruited into armed groups instead of going to school; the Arab Spring has disrupted access to education for millions of children; and in areas of the Philippines affected by Typhoon Haiyan, about 90 per cent of school buildings were damaged – more than 3,200 schools in all – leaving over a million pupils and 34,000 teachers with no place for learning.

Less than a month after the Typhoon, I was very happy to hear that the Ministry of Education in the Philippines was using the TLS 2011 to budget, program and plan a back-to-school campaign for the hardest-hit children in Tacloban. The TLS Compendium has helped drive the emergency response and enabled partners to rebound quickly and start designing appropriate and cost-effective learning spaces for children and families impacted by the Typhoon.

There is a critical difference between spending money versus investing in education. In Jordan’s Zaatari camp, which hosts nearly 130,000 Syrian refugees, we convinced donors of the long-term benefits of healthy learning environments in emergencies. A TLS is not a stand-alone structure ‘classroom,’ but a holistic learning environment with a set of facilities, including WASH services, areas for external play, internal learning spaces, teacher and staff space and perimeter fencing. In the Zaatari refugee camp, we designed and built three schools to serve more than 15,000 students in two shifts.

The TLS Compendium is predicated on the principles of Child Friendly Schooling, the minimal components to activate healthy learning environments for children. The profound social benefits of this programming are far-reaching. The second edition of the TLS compendium follows the same initiative of the 2011 edition: collect and centralize technical information, develop basic architectural drawings and provide cost-effective recommendations to improve the quality of these spaces in the context of emergencies.

Read More

Tags: , , , , , , , ,

After floods in Gaza, critical supplies help children recover and return to school

By Sajy Elmughanni

© UNICEF State of Palestine/2014/El Baba
With the help of Palestinian civil defence members, families evacuate after their homes were flooded during the recent winter storm in Gaza.

Following severe flooding in Gaza, UNICEF is supporting relief efforts for thousands of families who were driven from their homes and lost their possessions.

GAZA, State of Palestine, 30 January 2014 – In December, powerful thunderstorms and four days of torrential rain hit Gaza. Hundreds of families were stranded in their homes, inundated by rising waters, while others were forced to abandon their houses and seek safety on higher ground.

The flooding was so severe that many houses could no longer be accessed on foot, and some 10,000 people had to be evacuated to temporary shelters and relatives’ homes across Gaza.

For 9-year-old Anas Al-Jadba, what started as a regular family dinner turned into a frightening experience as he and his family had to be rescued from their flooded home late in the night.

“We have lost all our belongings,” Anas says. “I saw my clothes and books floating away in floodwater.”

It has been a month since the storm ended, but its effects still linger. Anas lives with his family of eight in a single bedroom at his grandparents’ home.

He recently visited the family’s flood-damaged house, which is still uninhabitable.

“It was awful and smelled like sewage,” he says. “There was no running water and no electricity.”

To help with relief efforts, UNICEF support, made possible by funding from the Bank of Palestine, has reached out to affected children and their families with essential hygiene supplies and children’s clothing to protect their health and to keep them warm.

© UNICEF State of Palestine/2014/El Baba
'We have lost all our belongings,' says Anas Al-Jadba, 9. 'I saw my clothes and books floating away in floodwater.'

Today, Anas is back at school, one of the many students who lost everything to the floods. In cooperation with the Ministry of Education and Higher education, and with funds from the Government of Japan, UNICEF has distributed school bags with stationery supplies such as pens and notebooks to 3,000 children across the coastal enclave.

“This distribution comes to restore the sense of normalcy in the lives of children who were directly affected by the storm,” says Pernille Ironside, Chief of the UNICEF Field Office in Gaza. “Children should feel that education must continue no matter what the circumstances are. This is especially important, as life was already dire before the flood.”

Densely populated Gaza is currently affected by one of the most serious energy crises in recent years. Access to safe drinking water also remains a concern in the coastal enclave, where half the population is under 18.

Read More

Tags: , , , , , , , , ,

In the Philippines, children ring in the new school year

By Diana Valcarcel

The official reopening of schools is a positive step towards recovery in parts of the Philippines still struggling to cope with the aftermath of Typhoon Haiyan.

Read More

Tags: , , , , ,

UNICEF appeals for US $34 million for the children of the Philippines, as Haiyan crisis deepens

MANILA/NEW YORK/GENEVA, 12 November 2013 – UNICEF is appealing for US$34 million to aid the four million children of the Philippines affected by Typhoon Haiyan when it ripped through the archipelago four days ago.

The appeal is a first estimate of the requirements needed to help children and their families recover, and is expected to cover 6 months.

The appeal is especially pressing because many of the regions slammed by Typhoon Haiyan are reportedly without electricity, clean water, food and medicine.

Read More

Tags: , , , , ,

Typhpoon Haiyan diary: “There is nowhere to go”

By Christopher de Bono, Regional Chief of Communication, UNICEF East Asia and Pacific

In the Philippines, the devastation of a ‘super typhoon’ has left communities helpless, while the Government and relief groups struggle to mount aid operations.

MANILA, Philippines, 12 November 2013 – I just got off the phone with Nonoy, a UNICEF colleague in Tacloban City, in the Philippine province of Leyte. He is a thorough professional, an old hand who has seen disasters and devastation before.

Read More

Have questions or comments about this website?

Share them! Email us your thoughts and help guide the future of this page

Useful Links